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Anticonvulsants

Seizure disorders have many causes but in cases where seizures are severe or frequent medications are needed to control the convulsions. These medications are used alone or in combinations and many require monitoring tests to keep blood levels constant and side effects at bay. Here is our sampling and be sure to review the seizure disorder section under the neurology section.


Diazepam (Valium)
 There are many uses for this medication since it is effective as an anti-anxiety medication, a muscle relaxant, an appetite stimulant, and a seizure control drug. The injectable form of diazepam is often used in anesthetic protocols.
Gabapentin (Neurontin)
 Originally this medication was used for treating partial seizures in humans but it was found to be useful in treating neuropathic pain (the burning and tingling sensations that come from damaged nerves.)
Levetiracetam (Keppra, Keppra XR, Kepcet, Kerron, Kevtan, Levitaccord, Levitam)
 As advances are made in seizure control in humans, medications eventually spill down into veterinary use; levetiracetam is a good example.
Phenobarbital
 In dogs and cats, phenobarbital is probably the first choice for seizure suppression. It is effective, safe if used responsibly, and is one of the least expensive medications in all of veterinary practice.
Potassium Bromide (K-BroVet)
 This medication was initially reserved for dogs who either could not tolerate phenobarbital due to unacceptable side effects or who needed additional seizure control medication. In fact, seizure control with potassium bromide is so effective that now many practitioners reach for it as a first choice therapy without even using phenobarbital.
Zonisamide (Zonegran)
 Zonisamide can be used either to supplement or replace phenobarbital in dogs and cats experiencing seizures.

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