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Emergency Information

Can you recognize an emergency? Are you prepared?


Alcohol (Ethanol) Poisoning
 Dogs and cats can get more than just drunk when they drink alcoholic beverages -- they can get a trip to the emergency room. Pets can die from alcohol ingestion.
Antifreeze Additives that are Taste Aversive to Protect Dogs and Cats
 At this time, the ASPCA is neutral on legislation requiring the addition of taste-aversive agents such as denatonium benzoate (Bitrex) to automobile antifreeze products containing ethylene glycol for the purpose of preventing poisoning in animals.
Bloat - The Mother of All Emergencies
 A serious, life-threatening emergency. Learn to recognize the signs to get your dog to the vet in time to possibly save his life.
Common Household Items Can Poison Pets
 Thousands of cats and dogs needlessly suffer and many die each year by accidental ingestion of household poisons.
Disaster Preparation for Your Pets
 Planning tips from the Humane Society of the United States, the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), the American Red Cross, and the Cat Fancier's Association can help you prepare for your pets safety in the event of a disaster. Pets are not allowed in emergency shelters.
First Aid: Emergency Care For Dogs and Cats (76)
 This book is an emergency preparedness ready-reference for dogs and cats.
Helping Animals During a Disaster
 Not everyone who volunteers at the front line will be heroically sloshing through flood waters looking for stranded animals. There will always be a tremendous need for workers to clean the animal housing units, feed the animals, assist disaster victims looking for their displaced animals, schedule workers, and organize supplies. These are usually positions for those in robust health who are capable of bivouacking at the scene without amenities.
Poisonous Plants for Dogs and Cats
 17 plants that are poisonous to dogs or cats from the ASPCA Poison Control Center.
Snail Bait Poisoning in Dogs
 Snail bait is commonly formulated in pellets and flavored with molasses or bran to attract snails, and unfortunately is attractive to dogs as well. Very little snail bait is required to cause poisoning (less than a teaspoon per 10 pounds of body weight).
Toxic and Non-toxic Plants
 This list contains plants that have not been reported as having systemic effects on the animals or as having intense effects on the gastrointestinal tract.
Xylitol Poisoning in Dogs
 Xylitol is potentially lethal to dogs. It doesn't take many sticks of gum to poison a dog, especially a small dog. Symptoms typically begin within 30 minutes and can last for more than 12 hours.

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